‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ of that movie

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‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ of that movie

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‘Dazed and Confused’ director delivers

Richard Linklater (“Boyhood”) successfully creates another critically acclaimed film, setting a completely different tone in “Everybody Wants Some!!”, the “spiritual sequel” to the cult classic film, “Dazed and Confused.” “Everybody Wants Some!!” was written and directed by Richard Linklater and produced by Paramount Pictures and Annapurna Pictures.

The film revolves around Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner, “Glee”), an incoming freshman baseball pitcher for the fictitious Southeast Texas State University, following his three-day experience as he explores freedom and the meaning of adulthood with his roommates – the rest of the baseball team – before school starts.

Set in 1980s Texas, the film allows Linklater to infuse many of his personal characteristics into the characters that he has written, creating something akin to his own college-aged autobiography, as mentioned by Jenner in an interview.

The movie begins as Jake enters the fraternity-like dwelling, typically reserved for the up-and-coming baseball team. Within the first twenty minutes, the audience sees the set dynamic, when seniors like the boastful Glen McReynolds (Tyler Hoechlin, “Teen Wolf”) show consistent hostility towards Jake (and freshmen in general), especially because Glen despises pitchers, constantly reminding teammates of pitchers’ uselessness.

On the other hand, Jake does make friends in Finnegan (Glen Powell), Kenny Roeper (Ryan Guzman), Dale (Quinton Johnson), Willoughby (Wyatt Russell), who each bring a new perspective of how to enjoy life while taking Jake on the ride with them. Then, there is the rule-following Billy Autrey (Will Brittain), who takes everything seriously, and the constantly-ranting Niles (Juston Street).

The group has two rules: don’t do anything too rowdy and don’t take girls upstairs – rules the curious group manages to break effortlessly. The group holds their hangout sessions between baseball practices in various bars and venues, which house various themed parties encompassing the many musical genres of the eighties, including hip-hop, country and disco, all while being in search of girls and sex, true to the title of the film. Even though the females show the same desire, Jake longs for a deeper relationship, particularly with Beverly (Zoey Deutch, “Vampire Academy” and “The Suite Life on Deck”). The couple share a very beautiful love sequence as they get into philosophical conversations, making the audience ask for more.

The highlight of the film was the details that were meticulously added to accurately portray the time period. As mentioned in the interview by Hoechlin, even the small gestures – such as the lack of high-fives and specific dance movements – were kept in mind when reproducing the time period, along with the sharp and witty attitudes of the baseball players, providing a “dirtier and grittier tone.”

The soundtrack was perfectly selected for this film, as it has songs like “My Sharona” by the Knack, “Alternative Ulster” by Stiff Little Fingers and “Every 1’s a Winner” by Hot Chocolate, making those that witnessed the time period feel incredibly nostalgic. Needless to say, the period was perfectly shown on screen, with even the outfit choices and the actors’ facial hair being accurate.

Going easy on the plot, Linklater provides great comedic relief throughout the film, making the audience constantly laugh and making the film highly relatable overall through the freshness of the cast and their interest in baseball.

The film was so enjoyable to watch due to the camaraderie that the cast was able to bring both on and off the screen. In one scene, during a baseball practice, one of the players reminds his teammates that a professional baseball team recruiter is in disguise, watching them play.

The camera then pans out to show a common man turned around, painting his house, which the team then believes is the recruiter, leaving the audience in constant laughter. This film, as said in cast interviews, allowed for each of the actors to live through their college experience once again, or to even create their own from scratch – this time, the way they want to.

When the dialogue was not comedic, the film became captivatingly deep, setting more of a coming-of-age tone. The beautiful balance of both tones allows for the audience to see how each character discovers himself, and definitely makes “Everybody Wants Some!!” a must-watch.