Blockbusters: A summer spotlight

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"Mr. and Mrs. Smith"

A new twist on the mundane life of suburbia is created in one of the many sure-fire hits of the summer, "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," due in theaters June 10. The premise of the movie involves a couple that has an all too common problem troubling many Americans: They are boring. Their marriage has lost vitality and excitement, and they are essentially in a rut.

But Jane and John are hiding a small detail about their respective careers: Both are assassins for opposing organizations. The truth slowly begins to unravel as John and Jane compete in a sequence of devious missions.

Two of today's sexiest stars, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie take on the main roles in the film, and this combination is sure to help rake in money at the box office.

The film is packed with action, humor and, of course, romance. A bona fide date movie, "Mr. and Mrs. Smith" will most likely please both men and women not only with the diversity of subject matter, but also with the pretty sweet eye candy.

~Rachel Tamer

 

"Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"

Tim Burton didn't really like the Gene Wilder classic "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory." Neither did Roald Dahl, the author whose children's book "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" inspired the quasi-musical.

With Dahl's vision in mind, the quirky Burton happily signed on to direct not a remake but a closer adaptation of the book.

Burton brought in screenwriter John August, his partner on 2004's "Big Fish," who hadn't even seen the 1971 version until after he finished the script.

Reluctant heartthrob Johnny Depp, another friend of Burton, beat out the likes of Marilyn Manson for the role of the eccentric factory owner, and then snagged his adorable co-star Freddie Highmore from "Finding Neverland" to play Charlie.

Coming out July 15, the result should be a great family film that's visually impressive, with candy-colored sets and Burton's signature gothic imagery.

~Kate Merwald